Friday, 21 August 2015

Why Should You Conduct Tenant Screening Background Checks?

Wouldn’t it be nice is every tenant paid on time and worked hard to make sure they didn’t disturb their neighbours? Tenant screening can help you find the ideal occupant for your property by helping your learn everything you need to know about your potential tenants. There are plenty of great tenants out there, and tenant screening will help you make sure you choose the right one.

The screening process will help you determine if you’re choosing the right tenant. Most screening processes include a criminal background check, credit report, employment references, and rental history. But what if the screening process all checks out fine … but there is still something “off” about the potential new tenant? 

Here are some red flags to watch out for:

  • Negative options about current or previous landlord
  • Bad references (especially a poor reference from a landlord)
  • Unexplained “rush” to move in (could indicate a previous eviction) 
  • Aggressive pets
  • Late arrival to rental showing
  • Different people show up for the viewing than previously discussed
  • Excessive criticism of property before they move in
  • Frequent relocation
  • History living with relatives or at motels
  • Frequent job changes
  • Inability to pay deposit prior to move-in date
  • Unprofessional phone or email correspondence
  • Promises to “update” your property … at no cost
  • Income that is less than 2.5 – 3 times the monthly rent
  • Prior eviction(s)
  • Unexplained nervousness regarding the screening process 
And of course, a criminal record and poor credit history are the biggest red flags to consider.

A thorough tenant screening process will ensure will cover your bases and protect you from losses related to late/no payments and property damage. Everything that is on your screening application should be verified – don’t take your tenant’s word for it! Protect yourself and your property with a background check.

Property managers and landlords use The Renwick Group background checks to screen their potential tenants. We offer many instant background checks for tenant screening, including credit reports and criminal records.

Contact us today for more information about our tenant screening services.


The Renwick Group has experience working with many different types of businesses and organizations providing skip-tracing, fraud investigations, WSIB support, legal team assistance, evidence gathering, employee background checks, and more. We also work with individuals who need help with personal matters. Call us at 1 (888) 722-9807 or visit our website for information.

Friday, 31 July 2015

Choosing the Right CCTV Camera for Corporate Surveillance

Video surveillance is a great tool for protecting employees, preventing theft and reducing the risk of criminal break-ins. In addition, it can assist your in supervising your employees to ensure safety protocols (including WCB rules) are followed, record that the right products were shipped or received without damage, and even prevent employee harassment.

There are so many CCTV cameras on the market today. This presents a great opportunity for you to find a camera that does exactly what you need. The first step in choosing a CCTV camera is understanding the main types of cameras out there, and of course determining the main purpose for your surveillance.

What is a CCTV Camera System?

Closed-circuit television (CCTV) is the use of CCTV video cameras to transmit a video signal to a monitor for live viewing, or to a recording device for viewing at a later date. They are used primarily for surveillance and security purposes.


What Type of CCTV Camera Should I Buy?

Here is a selection of the different types of CCTV Cameras you can consider:

Dome Camera

Dome Cameras are often used for indoor security and surveillance. Typical applications are retail environments, where the camera is designed to be unobtrusive, but visible. In addition, the "dome" shape makes it difficult to tell the direction that these cameras are facing, and thus are ideal for deterring criminals. The “bad guys” will know the facility is being watched and customers will feel at ease knowing the facility is being protected. Units that allow the camera to pan/tilt/zoom and spin quickly within the housing are often referred to as “speed domes.” Speed domes are used to cover a wide area with only one camera, or to avoid poor light conditions at certain times of day.

Bullet Camera

Bullet Cameras have a long, cylindrical, and tapered shape, similar to that of a "rifle bullet", often used in applications that require long distance viewing. The camera is not typically designed to have pan/tilt/zoom control but instead to capture images from a fixed location, pointing at a particular area.

A bullet camera is a wall-mount or ceiling-mounted unit that is typically designed for indoor use, but can also be used for some outdoor applications. Many bullet cameras can also be waterproof by being installed inside protective casings, which protect against dust, dirt, rain, hail and other harmful elements.

C-Mount Camera

C-mount cameras have detachable lenses to fit different applications. Standard camera lenses can only cover distances of between 35 and 40ft, therefore with C-mount cameras, it is possible to use special lenses, which can cover distances greater than 40ft.

Day/Night Camera

Day/Night cameras have the distinct advantage of operating in both normal and poorly-lit environments. These cameras do not have Infrared illuminators because they can capture clear video images in varying light conditions and in the dark.

The camera is ideal for outdoor surveillance applications, where Infrared CCTV cameras cannot function optimally. These cameras are primarily used in outdoor applications and they can have a wide dynamic range to function in glare, direct sunlight, reflections and strong back light 24/7.

High-Definition HD Camera

Ultra high-definition cameras are often relegated to niche markets, such as casinos and banks. These give the operators the ability to zoom in with extreme clarity (to look at a poker player who might have something up their sleeve).

If you plan to conduct corporate surveillance, there are some additional factors to consider.  Click here to view our post: Corporate Surveillance | What You Need to Know.


We offer a variety of corporate surveillance services that will allow us to discreetly gather information and assist you in presenting unbiased facts and circumstances. We have a strict privacy policy in place, and can assist you in navigating your own privacy-related legislative requirements.

Contact us today for more information about our corporate surveillance services.



The Renwick Group has experience working with many different types of businesses and organizations providing skip-tracing, fraud investigations, WSIB support, legal team assistance, evidence gathering, employee background checks, and more. We also work with individuals who need help with personal matters. Call us at 1 (888) 722-9807 or visit our website for information.




Tuesday, 30 June 2015

How Does Skip Tracing Work?


Skip Tracing Canada The Renwick Group - We find people
In the world of high personal debt loads, it's hardly surprising that many people fall into a bad debt situation, unable to pay their monthly commitments.  Being unable to pay and falling behind on your debts often means that your account will fall into delinquent collections.

Therefore the process of recovering the unpaid items such as cars, boats, and electronics, and / or  recovering the missing cash payments is a constant process for many businesses.

This type of problem is often sent firstly to a collections department and then if insufficient records are available, or the person has skipped out of town without leaving an address then a process called skip tracing kicks in. Many people have never heard of the term skip tracing here's a good definition for you.

“Skiptracing (also skip tracing) is a colloquial term used to describe the process of locating a person's whereabouts for any number of purposes. A skip tracer is someone who performs this task, which may be the person's primary occupation. The term comes from the word "skip" being used to describe the person being searched for, and comes from the idiomatic expression "to skip town," meaning to depart, perhaps in a rush, and leaving minimal clues behind for someone to "trace" the "skip" to a new location.”   (Skip Tracing - Wikipedia.com)

The days when you went to the phone book, criss-cross directory, or reverse directory are old-school and costly compared to the skip tracing technology options today.

With the advent of technology in general, and by using the Internet in particular, the availability and quality of information about people has expanded dramatically.

What types of information can be retrieved for skip tracing purposes. By contracting with a private investigator who specializes in skip tracing, you can gain access to all kinds of national information databases regarding a debtor.  Here are a few we frequently use as part of our skip tracing process:

Databases

Address directories
Phone directories
Nearby Information (those people who live next door to the address you are researching)
Social Security Number Verification
Credit reports/scores
Employment Departments
    Provide recent name, address, salary, etc.
Driver’s License/Vehicle Registration Departments
    Provide name, address, and asset information
Tax and Revenue Departments
    Provide name, address, and asset information
Court and Law Enforcement
Utility records
Property Assessor
Licenses (marriage, professional, business)
Business registration
Permits ... to name a few.

The Renwick Group has experience working with many different types of businesses and organizations providing skip-tracing, fraud investigations, WSIB support, legal team assistance, evidence gathering, employee background checks, and more. We also work with individuals who need help with personal matters. Call us at 1 (888) 722-9807 or visit our website for information.

Friday, 15 May 2015

Corporate Video Suveillance | What You Need to Know

Both large and small businesses recognize the importance of implementing video surveillance to protect employees, prevent theft and reduce risk of criminal break-ins. Video surveillance systems are relatively easy to install, however, you must consider privacy legislation to prevent potential litigation and ensure you’re following legislative privacy requirements such as those implemented under PIPEDA.

One of the first steps in protecting your business from litigation is implementing a Video Surveillance Policy and ensuring that all employees are aware of the system and its purpose. 

 Within your video surveillance policy, you should include:


· Purpose of the video surveillance system

· Where cameras will be used or not used

· Where the videos will be monitored

· Who will have access to the recordings and for what purpose

· Privacy procedures for requesting recordings

· Details and policies for archiving video footage


If your business is in the private sector, the privacy commission requires that your "… need to conduct video surveillance must be balanced with the individuals’ right to privacy, which includes the right lead their lives free from scrutiny. Given its inherent intrusiveness, organizations should consider all less privacy-invasive means of achieving the  same end before resorting to video surveillance."


Based on this requirement, the Privacy Commission has released a series of questions to help you decide whether or not you should implement corporate video surveillance. Check out their list below or view the entire article here.

10 things to do when considering, planning and using video surveillance

  1. Determine whether a less privacy-invasive alternative to video surveillance would meet your needs. 
  2. Establish the business reason for conducting video surveillance and use video surveillance only for that reason. 
  3. Develop a policy on the use of video surveillance. 
  4. Limit the use and viewing range of cameras as much as possible. 
  5. Inform the public that video surveillance is taking place. 
  6. Store any recorded images in a secure location, with limited access, and destroy them when they are no longer required for business purposes. 
  7. Be ready to answer questions from the public. Individuals have the right to know who is watching them and why, what information is being captured, and what is being done with recorded images. 
  8. Give individuals access to information about themselves. This includes video images. 
  9. Educate camera operators on the obligation to protect the privacy of individuals. 
  10. Periodically evaluate the need for video surveillance. 


We offer a variety of corporate surveillance services that will allow us to discreetly gather information and assist you in presenting unbiased facts and circumstances. We have a strict privacy policy in place, and can assist you in navigating your own privacy-related legislative requirements.


The Renwick Group has experience working with many different types of businesses and organizations providing skip-tracing, fraud investigations, WSIB support, legal team assistance, evidence gathering, employee background checks, and more. We also work with individuals who need help with personal matters. Call us at 1 (888) 722-9807 or visit our website for information.